The Threat of Amalgam Debris

 
Posted at 19-September-2008
by DSN official blogger  
 
Here are a few small steps to keep a written piece sounding fresh, lively, and intelligent.
\r\nWhile short and simple can be effective in certain circumstances, it more often than not equates to bland and trite. Whenever possible, avoid using nouns and verbs that are too basic and fundamental, particularly single-syllable ones.
\r\nUse the progression of the sentence below as a guide.
\r\n
\r\n“This would be hard to do.”
\r\n
\r\nHow might one improve a statement such as this?
\r\nFor starters, consider replacing the words “hard” and/or “do” in this sentence. If necessary and possible, consult a thesaurus for assistance: if you don’t have one handy, you can find computerized versions on-line or perhaps even in your document program (i.e.: Microsoft Word). The word “difficult” could substitute for “hard”; “do” could be replaced by “accomplish” or “achieve.”
\r\nThus, the sentence could be altered to read something like this:
\r\n
\r\n“This might be difficult to achieve.”
\r\n
\r\nYou could take your efforts a step further by adding descriptive terms. These will add emotion and depth to your statements. In this case, illustrate to your readers exactly HOW difficult the measure in question might be.
\r\n
\r\n“This might be very difficult to achieve.”
\r\n
\r\nDon’t stop at “very.” Try something a little more creative, such as:
\r\n
\r\n“This might be rather difficult to achieve.”
\r\n
\r\nOr better yet, if it’s appropriate:
\r\n
\r\n“This might be extremely difficult to achieve.”
\r\n
\r\nYou could liven up this sentence yet further. If appropriate, it could ultimately read something like this:
\r\n
\r\n“Such a feat might be extremely difficult to achieve.”
\r\n
\r\nIn all instances, repeat the sentence (and the sentences before and after it) over and over in your mind to make sure you are satisfied with the result. Perhaps the most important aspect of a keeping your audience engaged is to make sure your words will flow naturally as your readers read them.
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07/19/2014
 
ToewSw A big thank you for your article.Thanks Again. Really Great.
 
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07/18/2014
 
qRC7D5 Thanks a lot for the blog.Much thanks again.
 
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